Bank of America Plaza.jpg

Back When...

Much of my early career as a photographer was based around film. Back then, It was the only approach to photography. I learned how to handle all types of film, from roll film to sheet film. I mastered B&W, C-41 and E-6 processing. For the uninitiated, this is how black & white, color negative, and color transparency film is processed. I learned how to print B&W, Cibachrome, and traditional color prints. Then, at the turn of the century, photography was upended by the digital revolution. Digital cameras became commonplace. I, like many photographers of that era, opposed this evolution. It altered the process that we all knew, used, and respected: the process of setting up the camera, setting lights, arranging details, running Polaroids, exposing film, waiting hours or even days for the results, and hoping every step along the way went smoothly. Then, holding your breath until seeing the final transparencies on an 11x14 5000K color corrected Logan Lightbox. WOW!!! All of this acquired knowledge of film, a critical phase in every photographers life, virtually disappeared from view and the digital world was all that remained.

For most photographers, the introduction of these digital tools was not taken seriously. It was never assumed, back then, that film would ever disappear from most photographers gear bags. It was years before many professionals even acknowledged the value of digital tools. Then, in 2005, a colleague convinced me to start working with DSLR cameras. This changed my destiny. The Nikon D70 was my first digital camera. The rest is history. I never looked back and I’ve been using Nikon DSLR cameras ever since. (Actually, I've been using Nikon cameras as far back as 1982, the FE having been my first Nikon film camera). The dynamic range of the newer Nikon DSLRs is simply astounding and covers the needs of 90% of our clients. When the nature of a project calls for absolute State-of-the-Art digital capture tools, we also use technical cameras such as the Cambo Wide RS series.

In the early 1990’s, before the existence of digital photography, I would frequently explore the downtown Atlanta area with my Sinar P2 view camera. To photograph this particular image of the Bank of America Plaza, a long telephoto lens was necessary. Due to the focal length of the lens - 1200mm - additional “bellows”extensions were needed, as were extension tubes, and two tripods in order to accommodate and secure the extreme length and weight the configuration required. Click here to see how this shot was executed. Click the images again to return to this page. Just another day in the life of a passionate photographer lugging around 80lbs of camera to get that perfect shot...